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WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 12:38
Ok, so after some interest I've decided to open a separate thread detailing the retrobrighting work im using in my restorations.

I'll update this thread as I go along and include pics, links and all the necessary information you will need if you want to do it the same way I have.

The results so far have been great, and the procedure and ingredients have been much much simpler than the original retrobright support thread. Hats off to all who posted in that thread mind you!

Later today I will add the juicy bits and pics, and you will be able to follow me along with the procedure as I go about retrobrighting an Amiga 500 case (Or three!)

The usual caveats apply here of course :
Your results may differ slightly;
You may need to apply more than one coat of retrobright to your kit;

Make sure you follow the necessary safety information on the products we will use;

Make sure the room you do it in is fully ventilated;

Get yourself some protective gloves;

What I have also done in my case is to keep a large bucket of water nearby; if you get the mix on your skin or any other surfaces where damage may be caused, the water will dilute the mix and reduce potential damage.

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 13:47
So first of all, we come onto the ingredients.

This is very easy and we need just 2 products to make it work. Previously in the original retrobright thread, you needed several ingeredients, some of which were difficult to get hold of. This is not the case here.

First of all is the peroxide mix. This came in a 1 litre bottle; it is a viscous mixture, a little thicker than washing up liquid. The one we use is called Igora Royal :

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A close up of the label part so you can see exactly what to look for :

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Look for the same bottle as this. Notice it is 12% strength. It comes available in 6%, 9% and 12%. Several posts in the original retrobright thread discussed the differing strengths of peroxide to use. It seems that the weaker the peroxide, the longer it takes to work once it is applied. So for this example, Im sticking with the 12% one. It works for me.

The second ingredient is the bleach powder. This is also made by Igora; its full name is 'Igora Vario Blond Extra Power'. It comes in a dark blue drum containing 450g :

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Again, a close up of the label part :

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On looking inside we find a small plastic scoop :

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And the powder itself. This is a fine white powder :

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Note I have already made several mixes from this; originally the drum was full.

So there you have it folks. Just 2 ingredients, readily available at retail.

This is all you will need.

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To find these, I looked and found them on eBay and also there were several hairdressing suppliers in the UK selling them. I searched for 'Igora 12%' to find the peroxide and just 'Igora' for the bleach powder.

Here are direct links for both of them; first of all the peroxide :

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SCHWARZKOPF-IGORA-ROYAL-DEVELOPER-3-0R-6-OR-12-/330788580321?pt=UK_Health_Beauty_Hair_Care_Hair_Colouring_Dyes_PP&var=&hash=item4d04892be1

If you buy from this seller, make sure to use the drop down menu to pick the strength you want; again Im using 12% here. The retail price is currently showing 7.99; delivery is 5.50.

And now the bleach powder :

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Schwarzkopf-Igora-Vario-Blond-Extra-Power-Bleach-450g-White-/190697490165?pt=UK_Health_Beauty_Hair_Care_Hair_Colouring_Dyes_PP&hash=item2c6674c6f5

This seller is doing it at 16.39 with free delivery.

Total then is 29.88. This may seem expensive depending how much you want to do. These 2 containers will provide enough to make several batches though, so the value isnt actually that bad.

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 14:15
Next we come onto the tools you will need. These are items you should probably have lurking in the house somewhere; if not you can buy them cheap enough at any DIY shop.

First of all, a measuring jug :

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You can use glass or plastic here. I've used a normal pyrex glass one.

Next, a small paint brush. It doesnt need to be expensive, but do make sure it is clean :

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Then a spoon to mix it with. Im using a normal teaspoon :

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As i mentioned in my first post, keep some water to hand in case of spillage etc :

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So there you have it; all the tools you will need.

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How easy is this then :p

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 14:21
Next up, we will run through the mixing and application.

This is very straight forward.

First of all though, Im off into my man cave to find an Amiga worthy of this procedure. Its an old Amiga 500 that I bought from the other bay for the price of a few beers.

It is very very yellowed though, bordering on brown; a good candidate for our example here.

Remember that depending on the level of yellowing, you may not actually achieve the full original colour, but we will certainly improve on the current condition.

Pics of the Amiga in question coming shortly.

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 14:39
Well this is going to be a real challenge folks!

Here we have our intended target for retrobrighting.

Looks like this old girl has seen better days :(

Here she is :

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A close up :

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And another :

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The yellowing here then is excessive. Im actually stood between the light and the camera whilst taking the pics so there is a bit of a shadow.

This looks like a clear case of Amiga neglect !

To give you a better idea of how yellow this actually is, here is a pic together with an amiga PSU case part which I have just retrobrighted. Now you can see the massive contrast between clean and dirty/yellowed :

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We obviously have quite a task on our hands to bring this girl back to life; she looks quite poorly right now....

:sick:

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 15:04
So Ive opened her up to remove the top section of casing which we will be using.

As is often the case, we can always find little surprises when we open up an Amiga :shhh:

Flipping her over we can see she is cleaner underneath and has a missing trapdoor :

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But an original Commodore seal, still intact :

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That tells me she has never been opened. A normally positive sign then. But that sticker needs to be removed.

How do we tell its a genuine Commodore seal ? Well when we remove it we get the chessboard effect which makes its impossible to replace it back without showing signs of tampering, and the remaining squares stay quite shiny and silver :

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Inside she doesnt look all that bad :

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Even the inside of the casing is much cleaner than the outside :

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And whats this on the keyboard; never seen this before :

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A close up view shows some rivets/screws in unusual places; again Ive never seen this particular configuration on a keyboard before :

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And again at the top left side :

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Maybe this is an early model. This keyboard is new to me though, anybody seen one before ??

:unsure:

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 15:10
One final pic now, showing the contrast between a clean top casing and our target one :

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Such a dirty girl!

:lol:

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 16:03
So here I will cover the actual mix and application of the mixture. We will get quite heavy with pics.

My aim with this is to share with you my experience and also give a good pictorial guide that is easy to use and follow.

So, mixing up the retrobright paste then.

First of all give the peroxide bottle a good shake and squeeze some into your measuring jug; Im going for around 80mls here as im not applying it to the full surface of the cover. Once you have done this a couple of times you will get used to the amount of mix required, so dont worry if you have too much. If you run out simply mix some more in the same jug :

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Then simply fill your scoop with bleach powder and level it off. The amount of bleach powder doesnt need to be measured to the nearest gram. I generally use a scoop full :

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Throw it into the peroxide and give it a good stir :

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When you first stir the mix you will see some tiny lumps; this is the powder. We need to get rid of those, so just keep stirring until they disappear and the mix goes nice and smooth. 5 minutes of stirring will be enough. You will then have a super smooth mixture that is nice and thick; the consistency should be similar to that of whipped cream; it should stick to the spoon really well and feel very gloopy :

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Now we can start applying it to the case top.

What i have found is that we need to make sure those vent slots are completely immersed. Also make sure the amiga lettering itself is completely covered. I do this part first :

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A close up showing complete coverage and 'full' vent slots across the top :

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Note here i have only gone approximately 2/3 of the way across the casing. The reason for this is because I think we may need 2 applications. So the left hand section will remain as it is, the middle section will have one application and the right hand section will eventually have a second application. Then you will be able to see the results after each and the contrast between them. Eventually I will fully retrobright the entire case.

After filling those slots and lettering, then apply very liberally across the whole area to be treated. Dont skimp here at all. It needs to be nice and thick with as little plastic as possible shwing through. Ideally it should be completely white :

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Make sure to get good coverage at the ends too :

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Any remaining paste should be spread on nice and thick until it is used up; again; dont be shy, get it all on there :

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Now we have the application complete :

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Its time now to clean the tools you have used.

A thorough clean with warm soapy water will suffice. Notice how clean and shiny your jug and spoon have suddenly become ? ;)

Now we have to play the waiting game. I'll be leaving this for a full 24 hours.

A couple of things will happen during that time, but no need to panic! I will show you the changes as the process goes on.

The main point now is : dont touch it, dont move it, dont do anything with it. Leave the mix to do its job!

Stay tuned folks, and if you have any questions, feel free to post away :p

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 16:28
We are now waiting for the magic to happen. As Im sure Merlin will tell you, its not actually magic, its just a simple chemical process we are using. If you have some time to pass, go and read the original retrobright support thread. Theres some great information and insights in there and many posts from Merlin who is our resident chemist and all round good guy :)

A few points while we wait then.

The mix between peroxide and bleach powder; you should work somewhere around the 2:1 ratio (2 parts peroxide, 1 part bleach powder). This doesnt need to be exact though. You can add a little more powder if you want a thicker paste for coating round the edges and the bits between the keyboard sections.

Ive found no adverse effects by varying the amount of bleach powder.

So far I have not seen any signs of spots and patches developing after the procedure, which happened to a few guys using the original retrobright cocktail. This seems to be down to 2 possible things; inconsistency in the mix itself (Simply make sure you mix it really well!) or poor quality of the plastic mix that was orignally used to mould the casing. In the case of the latter, there is nothing we can do about that. Or maybe I have just been lucky so far; time will tell.

It could also be because the mix has dried out when the part was left outside exposed to sunlight. We are not doing that here.

I carry out the application of the mix on one of my kitchen worktops. These are very sturdy and hard wearing. There are no signs of staining, bleaching, or anything else, when the mix has come into contact with the worktop. If you have proper marble ones or something equally expensive, then my advice to you is to do it elsewhere on a surface that will not be affected by the mix.

Once again, leave it as is. Dont move, touch or play with it!

A couple of changes are going to occur during the next few hours or so.

First of all the mix is going to thin out i.e go a bit runny. This is perfectly normal and happens as part of the procedure. Bear this in mind when choosing the surface you will use to apply the mixture.

It will look a bit like a cake with runny icing as the mix appears to start dripping off a bit. Again, leave alone, this is normal.

Some time after that, the opposite will happen. The mix will appear to start thickening up. This again is a normal part of the procedure. The surface will go dull rather than shiny as it is immediately after application. The mix will eventually turn into a foam-like substance; the running will have completely stopped by this stage. It doesnt actually thicken as such; the consistency simply changes.

By the time we wash the mix off after 24 hours, it will be like part dried foam.

No forced uv light is required for this at all. I dont get a lot of natural light here because im on the ground floor of a 3 storey block. There is natural daylight but the sun cant shine through. The process will still work though.

It *may* work faster or a little better if done with uv applied i.e using a uv bulb over it, but you dont *need* this.

You could also put the plastic part into a plastic bag and seal it. This will at least stop it from drying out, and I would do this if I was putting it out in the sun. For the purpose of this though, I will leave it as is.

80sFREAK
7th September 2012, 16:38
check-in

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 17:36
Ok, a small update here.

After around an hour or so, the mix starts to expand a bit. This is expected. See how it has really covered everything well with the expansion :

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And again :

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We've missed a little bit on the end near the floppy opening, but thats ok for now :

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It will start to thin out and drip a bit soon....

WonkeyDonkey
7th September 2012, 21:18
A further update now.

We can see the mixture has started to 'run' a bit. Its not excessive though; if you remember the mix I used, there was slightly more bleach powder so it did end up a tad thicker than normal.

It reminds me of a cake that has been iced, and then icing starting to melt :

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And at the end :

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The overall view :

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It wont run any further now; I will just leave it overnight, and reveal the results afterwards.

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 16:30
Ok folks, the results are in :)

First up is to give it a good rinse under a warm tap :

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Where it was sat, theres lots of the waste remaining product :

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And underneath below the vents :

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The finished effect though, well it speaks for itself really :

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Together with the original comparison piece :

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From a side angle :

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It looks a bit patchy in that pic. Not sure if its something to do with the camera though; looking at it with the naked eye you cant see any patches at all.

And a final side view with the original comparison part :

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What a result! The change is huge I think!

We still have more work to do on it of course, but for one application of retrobright and considering the original state of it, i think the change looks superb!

Next I will proceed to apply a further coat, but this time it will just be the right most side of the case.

If you ever need proof that it works though, this is it.

:)

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 16:53
Moving straight on to the next stage then. Im going to repeat the retrobright procedure, but this time just applying it to one third of the case, on the right hand side :

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Cover those ends as best you can :

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Because im only covering a small part of it, this time I have used just 50mls of the peroxide for the mix. You will get used to the quantities required once you have done this a few times.

Once again, I shall leave this for a further 24 hour period and see what happens....

I dont expect the difference to be so significant following this second coat though.

:)

80sFREAK
8th September 2012, 17:04
Maybe you should seal vent gaps with cellotape from inside. I will try to do so.

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 17:07
Maybe you should seal vent gaps with cellotape from inside. I will try to do so.

Yeah im not too fussed about it leaking through to be honest. Remember how I said in a previous post that the mix thins out part way through the process, well thats presumably where it drips through the vents.

I suppose it also depends if you want to do the inside as well as the outside of the case too.

80sFREAK
8th September 2012, 17:16
For both inside and out you will need double time and double materials. I would prefer just seal plastic from inside with white paint. Maybe i am wrong. Well, will try soon :) Some more miggy's on the way to see bamboo shade, and some of them not as blond as should be :)

Merlin
8th September 2012, 17:18
@ WonkeyDonkey

Those A500 photos look a bit like the ones I took of my C64 case from when I did the original Retr0bright tests... it's come out well, though....:thumbsup:

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 17:23
@ WonkeyDonkey

Those A500 photos look a bit like the ones I took of my C64 case from when I did the original Retr0bright tests... it's come out well, though....:thumbsup:


Thanks Merlin!

If the second coat does anywhere near as much as the first did, I'll be even more impressed!

---------- Post added at 17:23 ---------- Previous post was at 17:20 ----------


For both inside and out you will need double time and double materials. I would prefer just seal plastic from inside with white paint. Maybe i am wrong. Well, will try soon :) Some more miggy's on the way to see bamboo shade, and some of them not as blond as should be :)

To be honest, I see little point in doing the inside so long as its not too bad. Yellowing desnt really occur inside as the light cant get to it in the same way, so i think the results there would be minimal.

I may try this again but see if it makes much difference by putting it inside a plastic bag as some others have done.

Im no expert here; just showing what works for me so far. :)

Snoozy
8th September 2012, 17:32
So the mix looks just the same as aquapuls and ivan were using a few months back in the photo booth section?

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 17:36
So the mix looks just the same as aquapuls and ivan were using a few months back in the photo booth section?

I havent seen them all but the mixes will generally be the same when using these hairdressing products yep.

A peroxide liquid/gel and white bleaching agent.

I suspect you could get half a dozen products from different manufacturers and they would all be the same when mixed and ready to apply.

I think the key thing though is the peroxide strength.

The original thread by Ivan/Aquaplus is here :

http://www.amibay.com/showthread.php?t=31469

Thats where i got inspired to start trying this and see what happened :)

lolafg
8th September 2012, 19:58
:) Great thread with great explanations/pictures and great result !!

:thumbsup:Thanks for sharing , will try that with my A1200 case one day ! :thumbsup:

johnim
8th September 2012, 20:14
this has worked well WonkeyDonkey :thumbsup:

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 20:15
this has worked well WonkeyDonkey :thumbsup:

Thanks john:)

Snoozy
8th September 2012, 22:39
So the mix looks just the same as aquapuls and ivan were using a few months back in the photo booth section?

I havent seen them all but the mixes will generally be the same when using these hairdressing products yep.

A peroxide liquid/gel and white bleaching agent.

I suspect you could get half a dozen products from different manufacturers and they would all be the same when mixed and ready to apply.

I think the key thing though is the peroxide strength.

The original thread by Ivan/Aquaplus is here :

http://www.amibay.com/showthread.php?t=31469

Thats where i got inspired to start trying this and see what happened :)

ah ok, how much do you use for each batch - i'm guessing one batch is enough to do a 1200 or 600 upper+lower case.

How many batches can you get from your purchase?

I dread to think what would happen to my carpet if i spilt some of the mixture, a stripey or polka dot effect no doubt :lol:

WonkeyDonkey
8th September 2012, 23:51
So the mix looks just the same as aquapuls and ivan were using a few months back in the photo booth section?

I havent seen them all but the mixes will generally be the same when using these hairdressing products yep.

A peroxide liquid/gel and white bleaching agent.

I suspect you could get half a dozen products from different manufacturers and they would all be the same when mixed and ready to apply.

I think the key thing though is the peroxide strength.

The original thread by Ivan/Aquaplus is here :

http://www.amibay.com/showthread.php?t=31469

Thats where i got inspired to start trying this and see what happened :)

ah ok, how much do you use for each batch - i'm guessing one batch is enough to do a 1200 or 600 upper+lower case.

How many batches can you get from your purchase?

I dread to think what would happen to my carpet if i spilt some of the mixture, a stripey or polka dot effect no doubt :lol:

Well i found 100mls peroxide and 50grams bleach powder was enough to coat the top half of an Amiga 500 case.

The bottle of peroxide is 1000ml, so if you stick to the measure above, your good for 10 batches. The powder is a 450 gram tub, so 10 at 45 grams is close enough i guess. It doesnt need to be bang on to the nearest half gram.

The basic recommendation for a normal batch is 100mls peroxide and 50 grams powder. You can vary this a little bit though, so you should be able to get 10 batches.

As for your carpet; I cant say :lol:

Mine is cream coloured though, do you think I would be that bothered if the worse was to happen :o


Edit : Regarding the 1200, Im not sure as I havent done one yet, although I have 2 of them here. I have a sneaking feeling though that the plastic used to mold them from was a bit different to the 500's. I think they may lighten up a lot easier. Mine are both snow white though lol

Anyone want to send me one for a free treatment ? :lol:

---------- Post added at 23:51 ---------- Previous post was at 23:33 ----------

My last edit statement there was the most pointless one ever, of course the plastic was different :picard

What I should have said is that the other additives in the plastic used to mould the case were quite different, and I think they will clean up better and quicker with retrobright.

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 10:22
Hi guys,

I wasn't planning to post more pics of the treatment as I've posted a few already. When I got up and looked at it this morning though, i saw something worth posting.

Remember when I said earlier how the mix goes through several stages including thinning out and running a bit ?

Well here is a very good example of that. Let me show you :

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From the original pics just after it was applied, we can see very clearly here how that mix has spread right out as it thinned out.

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Again, but this time around the side and the back.

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And there a final overview. The effects can be seen much clearer here than before.

Just thought I would share :)

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 17:32
Well here is the final one for that casing.

The last section I applied the second coat to has changed :

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Once again it looks a bit patchy on the camera pic, but here to the naked eye it looks fine. Its god rid of the blotchyness from the first coat quite well.

In terms of the finished result Im really pleased with it !

I chose this case because it was what I believe the worst case scenario; from where it began on the left to the final result on the right.

A casing with a lesser degree of yellowing should be just fine. So there you have it folks; I think this has turned into a good example of just what retrobrighting can achieve and how simple it can be, which is exactly what I set out to show.

There is another job to do before I'm finished though...

:)

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 17:56
Next it is time to get to work on that keyboard !

After popping the keys off, we can see what lurks beneath :

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And again :

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The keys themselves look rather poor; here I have turned a few upside down to give you an idea of what they *should* look like :

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First thing is to let them soak a while in some hot soapy water :

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We then need to make sure they are dry before retrobrighting :

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And again here; Ive flipped some of them over again. You can see lots of bits where they have not yellowed and the contrast between the two, much like the case we've looked at :

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For this Im taking a simple appraoch of using some bluetack (This particular one is white though!) :

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And a glass casserole lid. All I have done is cut the tack into strips and pressed them onto the bottom of the casserole lid :

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Now just press the keys into the tack to hold them in place :

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And now apply your retrobright mix to cover the keys. I have used a 100ml mix for this one; more than enough :

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When you first apply the mix, take time to ensure that the gaps between the keys are properly filled, then layer the rest across the top so you cant see any parts of the keys sticking through.

Now, once again, time to wait a while.....

:lol:

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 18:00
Ive actually ran out of peroxide mix finally after coating the keys there so will send for some more.

I will eventually retrobright the entire case cover to brighten the whole thing up and make it usable!

The keys however; well this is my first time doing the keys but Im using the same principles for them as I did the case.

J.T.Kirk
9th September 2012, 18:01
Seems you're doing an excellent retrobright-job there mate. :popcorn:

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 18:15
Seems you're doing an excellent retrobright-job there mate. :popcorn:
Thanks Phantom!

Hopefully this thread will show others just how easy it can be and what they should be able to achieve :)

WonkeyDonkey
9th September 2012, 18:26
Did i mention that doing the keys this way will also turn you into a meringue expert :

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:p

WonkeyDonkey
10th September 2012, 21:24
Well here are the results for the keys guys & girls. I honestly wasnt sure about the keys working the same as the casing, but to my pleasant surprise, take a peek :

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Cant really say a lot more about how much it worked !

I did around half the keys, just what fitted into the glass dish lid I used.

Ive arranged them above for the pic in lines of treated & not treated so you can see the change.

Absolutely brilliant result I think !

There remains a tiny tiny bit of yellowing on the light coloured keys, but you have to look really close to be able to see it.

:D

Just gotta wait for some more bleaching kit to arrive now.

I hope this thread has been of some value to those of you considering retrobrighting. As well as a very easy to use solution with just 2 ingredients, you also have the added benefit of not having to leave stuff out in the sun or start buying fancy uv bulbs and suchlike.

Job done !

:p

johnim
10th September 2012, 21:30
good results there on the keys :thumbsup:

Bryce
11th September 2012, 09:07
What a great tutorial, excellent read and great pictures. This really does show how easy it is to bring an Amiga (or any yellowed computer) back to its former glory.

I know this should probably be completely obvious to everyone, but it should probably be mentioned here anyway: You should really clean the case well before doing the retro-bright steps, especially in the grills and logos, otherwise you will be applying retro-bright onto the dirt in there instead of onto the plastic. An old toothbrush is great for doing this.

Bryce.

WonkeyDonkey
11th September 2012, 11:00
What a great tutorial, excellent read and great pictures. This really does show how easy it is to bring an Amiga (or any yellowed computer) back to its former glory.

I know this should probably be completely obvious to everyone, but it should probably be mentioned here anyway: You should really clean the case well before doing the retro-bright steps, especially in the grills and logos, otherwise you will be applying retro-bright onto the dirt in there instead of onto the plastic. An old toothbrush is great for doing this.

Bryce.

You are totally correct there Bryce. I automatically assumed everyone would do this anyway. I soaked all the parts in hot soapy water for an hour or so before i did any of the work; also you need to make sure they are completely dry before applying the mix too, otherwise it is more difficult to apply and get an even coat, since it tends to slide off.

Thanks for the positive comments too :)

Methanoid
24th September 2012, 22:22
Nice results. What surface are you leaving your Amiga and mix on overnight? Plastic worktop or stone?

And here's my contribution:

http://www.coolblades.co.uk/schwarzkopf-professional-igora-royal-colour-care-developer.html
http://www.coolblades.co.uk/schwarzkopf-igora-vario-bleach.html

Total inc delivery 21.11 - a nice saving over eBay!! :D

I'd interested in Merlin's opinion of this mix ;)

WonkeyDonkey
24th November 2012, 00:36
Nice results. What surface are you leaving your Amiga and mix on overnight? Plastic worktop or stone?

And here's my contribution:

http://www.coolblades.co.uk/schwarzkopf-professional-igora-royal-colour-care-developer.html
http://www.coolblades.co.uk/schwarzkopf-igora-vario-bleach.html

Total inc delivery 21.11 - a nice saving over eBay!! :D

I'd interested in Merlin's opinion of this mix ;)

Im actually just leaving it on a standard worktop surface in my kitchen, right next to the sink unit. Despite the mix being in contact with the surface for many hours, there are no marks, scuffs, light patches or any signs of anything developing.

I have spares of this if anything did go wrong mind you.

htdreams
25th November 2012, 19:25
Hi!

Very nice retrobright log, this is a very valuable document to everyone interested in taking old computers to life again :-)

I'm in the process of retrobrighting an Amiga 500plus (not so yellow as yours was) but first i'm trying with an usb keyboard with same ammount of yellowing.

My ingredients list is somehow a bit different, as i have 110vols 30% peroxide (we can get it in every pharmacy here in spain) and "maicena" (corn based food thickener) instead of Xanthan gum, hope to get same results... :whistle:

Thanks for sharing!

Merlin
25th November 2012, 20:52
@ Methanoid

Both of those should work; cationic surfactants won't cause an issue and they may leave your computer feeling silky smooth and manageable... :lol:

Give it a go and as always, we want picture pr0n...

bdb
26th November 2012, 09:31
Htdreams, take care with 30% peroxide! That is the strength that was used to fuel "certain" rockets in WW2. Once you reach 15%, that will start to oxidize human flesh and damage DNA.

htdreams
26th November 2012, 14:23
Htdreams, take care with 30% peroxide! That is the strength that was used to fuel "certain" rockets in WW2. Once you reach 15%, that will start to oxidize human flesh and damage DNA.

Yes, i'm using strong gloves for chemical manipulation, and also handling with care, and mixing with water to get a lower concentration

I didn't knew about the use as fuel in rockets, you always get to learn something :-)