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View Full Version : Yellow glasses for computer users: your opinion?



Xanxi
14th February 2015, 09:22
Hi.

I would like to know your opinion about these yellow glasses made by Gunnar for computer users.

http://shop.gunnars.com/computer-eyewear/l/100

Other brands are also selling similar products.

I am a radiologist and i am focusing my attention all day on computer screens, not to mention my own use of computers at home.

I am seriously considering to try and buy one of these glasses, even if i may look dumb wearing them at work.

Any feedback is welcome.

keropi
14th February 2015, 11:50
So what do the glasses suppose to offer in this time where lcd screens are everywhere?

Ed.D
14th February 2015, 12:30
Some info here. sorry I just removed the link I posted as there was some profanity on the website I didn't notice.


<Victor Meldrew>
Probably just an extra product line with a bit of advertising science thrown in to tempt punters; a bit like memory foam mattresses, I have one and my back is in a heck of a state.
</>

Xanxi
14th February 2015, 12:44
They filter blue light and give better contrast. Actually i already use yellow glasses to drive at night or by foggy wheater and it is really fine.
Computer glasses are more expensive thought.

protek
14th February 2015, 16:50
They filter blue light and give better contrast. Actually i already use yellow glasses to drive at night or by foggy wheater and it is really fine.
Computer glasses are more expensive thought.

Have you tried your driving glasses with the computer? Just a thought that there's no real difference to the driving glasses and marketing them as computer glasses is just an excuse to ask more money.

Xanxi
14th February 2015, 17:08
Not a bad idea, but my driving glasses are actually motorcycle driving glasses (my moto has been destroyed in an accident some years ago but i kept the glasses). They look like this, except they are from Baruffaldi:

83168

It would be difficult to wear them at work.

I should test them at home though :-)

commodorejohn
14th February 2015, 17:17
Obvious novelty gimmickry. If you're having eyestrain issues, don't try and reason that it's okay to push your eyes too hard if you use some novelty gadget to compensate; arrange to put less strain on them. You only have the one set, and from what I know of radiology, good vision is pretty important.

Xanxi
19th February 2015, 16:38
It seems that Gunnar's yellow glasses include an optical correction of +0.2 dioptries by default.
I think this is definitly not good and could modify your visual acuity on long terme use.
I already have a perfect visual acuity at 5 m and at 30 cm, so i think any visual correction is unwelcome.

However, i am going to start on monday a three days real-life test of driving yellow glasses at work to check if i see any difference.
I will keep you posted.

Snoozy
19th February 2015, 17:34
They filter blue light and give better contrast. Actually i already use yellow glasses to drive at night or by foggy wheater and it is really fine.
Computer glasses are more expensive thought.

Have you tried your driving glasses with the computer? Just a thought that there's no real difference to the driving glasses and marketing them as computer glasses is just an excuse to ask more money.

This is incorrect, vdu prescriptions usually have additional + for the appropriate working distance, dependent on the accommodative status of the patient. Driving glasses would be inappropriate for vdu work unless the patient is younger than 40 years of age.

(wow, i'm glad my patients aren't as cynical)

(source: me, optometrist, post grad doctor of optometry)

Xanxi
19th February 2015, 18:36
So what do you think of the +0.2 on the aforementioned glasses for someone with no usual correction (Monoyer 10/10, Parinaud 1,5 on french usual optic tests)? Im talking of wearing them 5 hours straight or more.
And yes i am less than 40 :D

ChrisUnionNJ
19th February 2015, 19:00
Back in the day they sold here as amber vision and
were for nite driving and they did work very well
on low lit area's I use to drive alot at nite so they
came in very handy and they also claimed to work
well with people who worked long hours on computers
but for gaming it changed some of the colors so I did
not use them for that..

Snoozy
19th February 2015, 19:02
+0.2D is a very limited amount, although its a grey area in giving such a correction without a refraction having been performed. The argument would be that since magnifying reading specs are freely available, these +0.2 lenses should be available. Personally I don't like magnifying ready reading spectacles as they encourage the progression of asymptomatic eye disease by discouraging people from having an eye exam ("I can manage perfectly fine with these ready readers" from age 40 - 60, the Optometrists and Ophthalmologists are left to pick up the pieces of chronic open angle glaucoma when the patient finally presents for eye exam aged 64 with distance vision blur) Ready readers lull the public into a false sense of security with their vision. But then we are diverging.

I know France is bereft of Optometrists, but you are a medic so I think you could try them and see, I don't think +0.2 overcorrection is going to do much harm - but similarly it's of such a small amount it won't do much good, perhaps like taking a quarter of a paracetamol :)

Incidentally, much of the research in Optometry and Ophthalmology is assessing the damaging effect of blue light on macular pigment - blue light is prevalent everywhere- especially in LCD and LED tv's. Macular pigment is linked to protecting the retina from macular degeneration, our biggest age related eye disease problem in the western world. Future lens designs in spectacles will be filtering out damaging blue light.