Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: My New Toy

  1. #31
    I Find Your Lack of Fat Disturbing Amibayer! tbtorro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Country
    Denmark
    Region:
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    6,486
    Feedback
    961 (100%)

    Default

    Nice, but those tweezer tips are way too big for small pitch SMD parts (like capacitors on Amigas) so it'll be difficult to get reliable heat contact, especially with leaked capacitors where the oxides from corrosion act a heat barrier. I advise you that as a minimum only attempt to desolder trash PCBs first, and take a very good look afterwards at the pads to see if they are undamaged. Better yet, get a much smaller, pointy tip.
    Last edited by tbtorro; 30th May 2017 at 09:18.
    cє<

  2. #32
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tbtorro View Post
    Nice, but those tweezer tips are way too big for small pitch SMD parts (like capacitors on Amigas) so it'll be difficult to get reliable heat contact, especially with leaked capacitors where the oxides from corrosion act a heat barrier.
    Aye, I agree they might be a too big for working on something like radial cap leads or small chip components (website says they're 0.080" chisel at the ends) -- I was checking placement and size against a bunch of components in my dead board pile, and for most of the SMD parts they're wider than the pads themselves. They do also appear to be the smallest tips available for the CT-15 from what I've seen..

    From the videos and techniques posted on the PACE website it implies they're really only meant for the chip type SMD components with plates/leads to grasp on either side:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2017-05-30 at 12.35.45 PM.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	10.1 KB 
ID:	122542

    I think trying to use them on the pads would probably be as about as gentle as scraping them with a flat blade screwdriver...

    That said I'll probably still experiment with adding flux and making solder blobs on each side of a few components with the regular iron to make contact points for the tweezers just to see how effective (or not) they are for the task.

    ---
    Edit: Yup, they are terrible for removing radial SMD caps -- It kinda works but then I'm just cleaning melted plastic off the tips, and it needs enough pressure to leave a mark on most pads; though with the type of components I pictured above and with a bit of flux it seemed to do just fine.


    Quote Originally Posted by tbtorro View Post
    I advise you that as a minimum only attempt to desolder trash PCBs first, and take a very good look afterwards at the pads to see if they are undamaged. Better yet, get a much smaller, pointy tip.
    No worries, I definitely won't practice/train on any good boards -- I've got a nice stockpile of dead laptop, router and other random PCBs for demolishing on the go

    I hadn't planned to get the CT-15 before trying out the TT-65 tweezers, but I jumped on the deal. The TT-65 tips are rather expensive and specific-purpose, though I recently found out the PS-80 / IR-70 tips are compatible with the TT-65 (YouTube Link) and you can get the angled conical, chisel and mini-wave (divot in the tip) which should work well in pairs as as pointy tweezers.
    Last edited by cjcliffe; 31st May 2017 at 04:17. Reason: Did some testing
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  3. #33
    CrazyBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Country
    The Netherlands
    Region:
    Limburg
    Posts
    799
    Feedback
    135 (100%)

    Default

    What also might help is by using solder blobs on the end of both tips. I've similair tweezers and when I use enough solder (heat dissipation) the caps come right off without damaging the board.
    => Commodore A600HD/40 <=
    3D Amiga Gotek frames: http://www.thingiverse.com/_CrazyBob_/designs

  4. #34
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CrazyBob View Post
    What also might help is by using solder blobs on the end of both tips. I've similair tweezers and when I use enough solder (heat dissipation) the caps come right off without damaging the board.
    I've tried tinning the tips but they won't take any solder regardless of which tip tinner or flux I used; and that appears to be by-design like the resistance tweezers since they are able to be cooled before removing them from the work without sticking to it.

    Putting a bit of excess solder on the SMT component itself seems to do the trick but it's a fair bit more preparation than I'd like for removing components quickly and there's no temperature feedback with the conductive tweezers so it takes some practice to get the pulse setting and pedal control balanced.
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  5. #35
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Cool New tips, burning in the ThermoTweez and another IR-70

    Picked up some new tips for the IR-70 and TT-65; found a good deal on 5-pack of bent chisel tips and a 3-pack of mini-wave tips. The bent chisel tips work well in the IR-70 but are also usable with the TT-65 (thanks to a "tip on tips" from MikesRadioRepair on YouTube).

    Here's a couple pictures where I was trying out the tips and playing with alignment before doing a burn-in:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01_ThermoTweez_BentChisels.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	180.2 KB 
ID:	124681 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	02_ThermoTweez_BentChisels2.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	189.7 KB 
ID:	124682

    Before I could use it I needed to burn-in the iron, so I fired up the fume extractor and used the automatic burn-in mode built in to the ST-45; it runs at 316c for 10 minutes then brings it up to 427c for 15 minutes before shutting it down -- this also matches heat and timing steps described on the red burn-in information card:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	03_ThermoTweez_ST45Brn.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	184.4 KB 
ID:	124683

    After burn-in and re-installing the tips I tried it out for removing a few components; the components pictured here were very simple to remove with just a bit of flux on the leads. The radial SMT caps were removed easily as well, though the ones pictured here are a little beat-up as they've been through a few installation/removal practice sessions

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	04_ThermoTweez_Removals.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	186.2 KB 
ID:	124684

    Since I don't actually have a proper cubby for the tweezers I've a managed to repurpose the ConducTweez cubby which seems to work fine for now:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	05_ThermoTweez_PHCubby.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	181.3 KB 
ID:	124685

    Next up I got a great deal on another IR-70 iron; it seems decent and works just as well as my original. Also pictured are the Mini-Wave tips, which provide a small hole in the tip for keeping a nice meniscus of solder on the surface, which is very useful for tasks like drag soldering and removing bridges from fine pitch SMT components.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	06_37W_IR70_1.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	186.3 KB 
ID:	124686

    In comparison to my original iron this one shows 'Heavy Duty" instead of "High Capacity" -- The "Heavy Duty" element is rated at 37W while the High Capacity iron is rated at 48W. Didn't notice much difference when using it but I'm sure it would make a difference for heavier tasks.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	07_37W_IR70_vs_48W_IR70.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	186.1 KB 
ID:	124687
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  6. #36
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Smile New tips and tools!

    Been awhile since I've posted last and I've added a few new things to the bench to show off since then

    Found a couple nice deals on packages of of tips; a 10-pack of various chisels and an 8 pack of extra-pointy bent conical tips that are great for the tweezers:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01_PSIR_Tips2.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	191.2 KB 
ID:	131565 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	02_TT65_PointyTips.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	199.0 KB 
ID:	131566

    A nice 12-pack of extractor tips I found for less than a 5-pack -- which I needed badly since I finally wore through the conical thermo-drive tip that came with it

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	03_New_SX70_Tips.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	211.1 KB 
ID:	131567

    A more modern PS-90 soldering iron with stand I picked up late last year; brand new from an online auction for about half of retail. It's a little bit more powerful than the IR-70 and I also find it's much more comfortable to use:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	04_PS90_BurnIn.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	181.0 KB 
ID:	131568

    A lightly used Panavise electronic work station I grabbed for about the price of a large pizza earlier this year -- this thing has been awesome for holding and manipulating boards so far:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	09_Panavise.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	187.6 KB 
ID:	131573


    More recently a nice lot of tools and accessories that I managed to grab for less than the price of the ThermoJet nozzle included with it. Came with a ThermoTweez, ThermoJet, a much needed tweezer stand, brand new cleaning station, tube fittings and markers, tip cleaners and an extractor glass chamber brush:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	05_TJ70_TT65_Lot.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	194.6 KB 
ID:	131569 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	08_TT65_Stand.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	189.5 KB 
ID:	131572

    The tips in the lot were ones I'd been looking for as well, the single jet nozzle is great for putting in small surface mount parts and the wider tweezer tips are useful for larger SMT components:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	06_TT65_TJ70_Tips.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	193.5 KB 
ID:	131570

    Comparing to my original ThermoTweez and ThermoJet they appear to be mostly the same, except for a different grounding lead connecting the heaters (no wire, just a metal strip?) and the printing on the labels is smaller and more evenly spaced:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	07_TT65_TJ70_Labels.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	196.6 KB 
ID:	131571

    And finally here's an updated picture of the workbench -- I might need to upgrade to a bigger desk soon

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	10_Bench_Feb2018.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	195.2 KB 
ID:	131574
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  7. #37
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Talking More tools! Newer type SX-80 Sodr-X-Tractor, TT-65 Tweezers and TP-65 Thermopik

    I should probably stop adding more handpieces to the collection now but I couldn't turn down at least one more crazy deal.

    It was posted with rather broken english (apparently they're "Sends Temp 2 Thermopylae" -- Spartan battle heaters? ) and the description was hard to decipher, but the seller had a rock-solid review history and it was posted for less than the cost of the tips included in the tweezers.

    The lot includes an SX-80 Sodr-X-Tractor, TT-65 ThermoTweez, TP-65 Thermopik, air filter and two stands; the handpieces also have the newer-type black handles:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01_NTL_Overview.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	188.1 KB 
ID:	132495


    The Sodr-X-Tractor and Thermopik appear to be lightly used at best and the ThermoTweez doesn't appear to have been used at all:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	02_NTL_Closeup.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	190.7 KB 
ID:	132496

    The SX-80 is a fair bit different than the SX-70 and requires the newer type tips with the extended back to reach all the way to the chamber (luckily they're compatible with SX-70 too). With the SX-70 you have to carefully pull the whole chamber out the back-side to empty it -- but on the SX-80 it's easily done via the spring-loaded grip on back of the handle which releases it from the side compartment. Unfortunately it didn't include the re-usable glass chamber, only one of the cardboard solder traps instead -- but the glass chambers aren't expensive and I've already ordered one for it:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	03_NTL_SX80.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	204.4 KB 
ID:	132497Click image for larger version. 

Name:	04_NTL_SX80-SodrTrap.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	200.0 KB 
ID:	132498

    The tool stands are missing the protective plate on the base but I'm not too concerned as I have some silicone mats to put under them for now:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	05_NTL_Stands.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	186.9 KB 
ID:	132499

    With the addition of this set I now have at least one backup for of each of the SensaTemp tools, which gives me a bit more peace-of-mind using them as I won't be left without if one breaks down. But from what I've seen of all the used PACE equipment still being sold from the 1970s and '80s in good working order I think I may be over-prepared
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  8. #38
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Talking More additions: Pik & Paste, Intelliheat and Lapflo tips

    Been awhile since the last update and I've accumulated more more equipment for the bench that I wanted to share

    First up is the dedicated Pik & Paste (PPS-60); I managed to get this unit for less than the cost of their plastic dispenser tip kits:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01_PikAndPaste.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	173.6 KB 
ID:	143990

    I had difficulty finding any information about it online but it appears to be the same Pik & Paste hardware that's part of the PRC-2000 (sounds it makes are identical) with a few additional controls.

    Unlike the PRC the P&P has an interval setting (timed repeat) and individual controls for the pressure and pull-back suction with a gauge that indicates the current PSI.
    Also (in addition to the standard pedal port on the back) it includes a mono switch jack on the front for controlling the activation from any type of switch you'd like.



    Next I managed to pick up an ST-30 "Intelliheat" unit with Iron + Tip plus the "Instant Set-Back" cubby; managed to get the whole set for what the ISB cubby alone would have cost:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	02_ST30_TD100.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	181.9 KB 
ID:	143991 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	03_ST30_ISB.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	186.6 KB 
ID:	143992

    Intelliheat is their newer line of handpieces that use the cartridge-type tips where the heater, sensor and tip are combined into a single, easily hot-swappable part. I find it very fast to heat up (~5 seconds to hit set temperature) which makes it extremely useful for quick jobs. The ISB cubby also works great at turning the iron off and on when needed and should really help prolong the tip life.

    I examined the unit and there appears to possibly be some sort of field effect sensor (makes no contact) to determine whether the iron is in the cubby or not; I may have to hook up the scope at some point to see what it's doing.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	04_ST30_ISB_Detect.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	188.1 KB 
ID:	143993



    Next I managed to nab this ST-70 Intelliheat unit; really didn't need this one but it was cheap, and I liked how simple the design is -- Just plug in the appropriate power module (resistor) and it'll use the module rating as the set temperature; no other controls needed. Seems most ideal for a production environment when you want to have a simple way to avoid operator error.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	05_ST70.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	184.6 KB 
ID:	143994 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	06_ST70_PMOD.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	168.7 KB 
ID:	143995



    For the last one I was relieved to finally get a replacement for my Lapflo tip which I broke.. I managed to lean on the pedal at the wrong time while adjusting the pulse heat, and before I realized what was going on it went white-hot for a couple seconds and broke apart:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	07_LapfloTipBroken.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	180.0 KB 
ID:	143996

    I very much lucked out on the replacement though as the listing was just for the Lapflo handpiece and single-point tip (for half the price of just a replacement tip) but when it arrived it actually included TWO replacement tips plus an extra "hot bar" tip which alone is priced 6x more than the one I was looking to replace.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	08_NewLapflo.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	169.9 KB 
ID:	143997

    Stay tuned.. More deal brags and borderline compulsive hoarding to come
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  9. #39
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Cool Another lot of tools; because overkill is underrated

    For my last haul of 2018 I was delighted to find a Canadian seller who'd hastily lumped a collection of tools into a single BIN lot with virtually no description.

    I was primarily interested in the thermal wire strippers (TS-15) -- but the the entire lot plus shipping was priced less than a quarter the cost of the TS-15 alone which made it a no-brainer sale for me.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01_PaceLot_Oct2018.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	192.6 KB 
ID:	143998
    (original listing photo, two of them had the cords cut but brand new heaters and tip for some reason??)



    Included in the lot was a grey SX-70 Sodr-X-tractor with a cracked case; since they're all the same I simply swapped the case with the one from the newer black Thermopik (with the cut cord) to make it usable again. I like the color combination of the mismatched grey cord and black body, which also makes it easy to differentiate from the other SX-70 without having to check the tips.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	02_SX70-Refurbed.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	186.2 KB 
ID:	143999


    Additionally there was an old-school 120V non temperature-controlled SX-25; it wasn't functional but with a bit of probing with the multimeter I found that someone had simply over-tightened the plastic cable set-screw and severed the power line. All I had to do was cut the cord shorter to remove the broken piece and re-crimp and connect the lines to the heater and it was working again:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	03_SX25-Refurbed.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	184.0 KB 
ID:	144000


    The only actual broken units in the lot (after exchanging the SX-70 shell) were these two Thermopiks (TP-65); both with cracked handles but still contain working parts otherwise:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	04_TP65_BustedPair.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	190.4 KB 
ID:	144001


    In addition to the two broken Thermopiks there were four more included that are working perfectly:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	05_4x_TP65.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	186.3 KB 
ID:	144002


    Also included were two sets of TT-65 tweezers and two TJ-70 ThermoJets.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	06_2x_TT65_2x_TP70.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	186.3 KB 
ID:	144003


    And last but not least there were 4 pulse-heat tools and cable included with the lot; I didn't have any need for more resistance tweezers but the wire strippers are extremely useful. Since I've started using the wire strippers I've managed to strip hundreds of wires without re-cutting or breaking any strands -- they're now my go-to wire strippers when there's no margin for error

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	07_4x_Pulse_Tools.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	177.5 KB 
ID:	144004


    And finally while I was in the process of moving recently I snapped a family photo of the entire collection:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	08_AllTools2018.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	207.8 KB 
ID:	144005

    ---

    Edit: Bonus picture; a quick panoramic shot of the new workstation, bench has finally been re-assembled into one piece after many years apart:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bonus_2019_Workbench_Pano.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	211.1 KB 
ID:	144006
    Last edited by cjcliffe; 19th February 2019 at 02:50. Reason: Added bonus pic
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

  10. #40
    cjcliffe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Country
    Canada
    Region:
    Kingston, Ontario
    Age
    38
    Posts
    150
    Feedback
    9 (100%)

    Smile Philips PM3110 Oscilloscope

    Found this scope at the local thrift shop; looks like it's from mid-1970s but appears to still be fully functional. It's just a basic 2-channel 10Mhz scope; but seems simple to use and should be more than enough for some old-school repairs and tinkering.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Scope_PM3110.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	185.4 KB 
ID:	145943 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Scope_Cal2.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	191.2 KB 
ID:	145944

    Manuals, schematics, parts list and service guide are still available online in PDF format -- so I'll probably end up replacing the electrolytic caps in this unit before I let it run for very long.
    A1000 0.5M; A500 1M; A500+ 1.5M A500+/030 33Mhz 10.5M, MMR, IDE68k, 500RX, HxC Internal, Indy ECS & 4G CF
    A600/030 25Mhz 34M, ACA630, A604, Indy ECS & 8G CF A1200/030 42Mhz 66M, ACA1231 & 8G CF
    A4000D/040 33Mhz 18M, DVD, X-Surf & 8G CF C64; C128 +uIEC/SD Internal & JiffyDOS

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •