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Thread: HDMI over ethernet. Has anyone tried this?

  1. #11
    Amibayer! Bryce's Avatar
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    Yeah, I've no idea where they come up with those speeds. I assume they do it over a very short distance with an artificially generated 50Hz carrier (simulating a powerline) in ideal conditions through screened, twisted cable. Most house wiring is neither shielded nor twisted, so it's highly unlikely that those speeds would ever be possible in real conditions.

    Bryce.

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    Yeah I
    Can get about 300 mb through my 500mb powerline adapters. Still generally a lot better and further distances than Wi-fi


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    Pickle Riiiick! Amibayer! Trapshot's Avatar
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    I've got a new build house that I had CAT6A throughout put in. It's a 1Gbit/10Gbit LAN, and that side of it works really well with sub 1ms across the whole infrastructure and good sustained throughput. I then bought the Neo HDBase-T transmitter for the CAT6 transmission (70Meters for 4K, 100Meters for 1080P). I've not fully started settings them up yet, but I have read up and tried them over the CAT6 and via back-to-back cabling with the results that: Back to back they work fine, but HDBase-T will not work over a switched Ethernet network, so I've patched through directly across the CAT6 patch panels, but this also doesn't seem to work. Even when connecting directly over a single CAT6 module through to the patch panel (so not doubling back) it doesn't quite work. To clarify, I get the power signal to the receiver, but no "signal" (indicated by an LED which lights/flashes when connected back to back). This I'm assuming is to do with either the cabling length (unlikely but possible), or the cabling itself (either the joins in the modules/patch panel, or the fact that the cabling somehow is changing wiring configurations which it shouldn't be as it's all straight-through at that stage). The back-to back cabling I've tried is both straight-through and cross-over.. both work fine when the boxes are like this, so at the moment I've put them aside for another time. I have an AV installer that is going to take a look (as it was part of an install package I bought with Dolby Atmos etc.) so if I get this working over the structured cabling i'll let you know.

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    I have a fairly new house and powerline adapters doesn't work that great at all...
    Had to try different wall sockets in different rooms to get it to work at all.
    Was also hoping to get a decent lan solution to my workshop that is ~70m away from the house, but it doesn't give any reasonable speed or stability

  5. #15
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    For your workshop what cables are you using? Shielded Cat 6 should work for that distance. But you could try an Ethernet repeater along the line to boost the signal.

    I've got a run of Cat 6 ethernet cable running from the house to my workshop in the garden and that's about 40 meters. Gives a good speed. There are no other houses much to interfere with the cable as the houses in my road are all in a line with the gardens running behind.

    70 metres is quite long though as the theoretical limit is 100m.

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    Amibayer! Bryce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thelemorf View Post
    I have a fairly new house and powerline adapters doesn't work that great at all...
    Had to try different wall sockets in different rooms to get it to work at all.
    Was also hoping to get a decent lan solution to my workshop that is ~70m away from the house, but it doesn't give any reasonable speed or stability
    I'm not sure about Sweden, but in Germany we have all 3 phases supplied to the house and different phases are used for different parts of the house. Obviously powerline transmissions won't jump from one phase to the other, so if that's the issue you'll have to move the sockets in both rooms to the same phase.

    Bryce.

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    Yes, we have all 3 phases too. Only in small apartments that you only get 1.

  8. #18
    Amibayer! Bryce's Avatar
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    Then you'll need to make sure that the whole stretch is on the same phase.

    Bryce.

  9. #19
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    So you have a three phase electrical installation with 3 separate mcbs connecting the house into separate electrical zones?

    Is that now common practice in some countries? And why would you need 3 phase in a standard house? If you were drawing more than the 7.5kW a normal setup can cope with I would be questioning what you are connecting. Even with appliances like washing machine, tumble dryer, kettle and electric oven all running at once it wouldn't get anywhere near that.

    Also are the sockets than connected from the MCBs via radial circuits?

    Or do you have similar to the US with 240V supply for heavy duty appliances and 110V for general household sockets?

    In the UK our domestic supplies are generally all single phase with one MCB (commonly referred to as a consumer unit). We have to have RCDs in the unit protecting different zones of the house, then different rated trips depending on the circuit, and individual circuits for things like ovens and heaters.

    We do of course have 240V electrical supply which is a lot more dangerous than 110V which in theory can't kill you and is why all building sites only allow 110V power tools.

    Our sockets are also connected on ring main circuits. Normally one ring for downstairs, one for upstairs and another for the kitchen. Then radial curcuits for things like the garage or garden shed. I know the UK is one of the few to use ring main circuits. I personally like the idea for load balancing and ensuring the electrical supply is provided evenly along the whole socket run. I also think the UK plug socket design with built in fuse, earth and shuttered socket design is the best and safest in the world. Really don't like the flimsy plugs used in many other countries.

    It's interesting learning about electrical standards in other countries though. The scary one is how bad the standards in us electrics are though. I hate the idea of electrical nuts to join cables. They are banned in the UK but common practice in the US. Mad that every time you need to change a connection you have to cut the old nut off losing some cable length and then twist a new nut in, which can come loose. Much better to use terminal blocks or the newer Wago connectors. It's also worrying the terminology electricians in the US use such as referring to the live wire as hot.

    I also find plug socket and light switch design and assemblies in other countries quite old fashioned compared to uk standards. Might just be me and what I'm used to.

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  10. #20
    Amibayer! Bryce's Avatar
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    The German system is as follows:

    The 3 phases come into a single MCB, so the box has a neutral busbar, an earth busbar and three phase busbars. The only 3 phase connection outside the box is usually to the cooker, where all three phases are available, however the cooker is also just splitting, usually using one phase for the left two rings, one for the right rings and one for the oven. In the junction box the phases are usually shared between areas or functions. So you might have "Lights and sockets upstairs" all connected to one of the phases, "Lights and sockets downstairs" connected to a second phase and the third phase could be used for garage / Basement / utility room or whatever.
    Due to the powerline equipment, I shifted things around, so I have one phase doing all the lights plus the sockets in the kitchen and the second phase doing all the other sockets.
    In some rare cases, where there is an electric water heater in the house, this might also have a three phase supply.
    It's all radial, no ring architecture here.

    As for plug style: I come from Ireland, so I grew up with the UK style which I liked and is very well designed, however I now prefer the European style despite the lack of fuse. My only gripe would be the fact that it can be plugged in either way around, so you have no idea which wire is actually the live and which is the neutral. American and Japanese plugs are the worst, they are just scary as far as safety is concerned (despite only being 110V).

    Bryce.
    Last edited by Bryce; 14th July 2017 at 13:57.

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