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View Full Version : Review: SMD tweesers - 60 watt.



mjnurney
14th June 2012, 00:04
i have been after some SMD tweezers for a while but I've been reluctant to buy any as i fear they are junk.

Well i bought some and after a couple of days wait , they arrived and i can say that all my fears where correct.

They are junk.

why?

well, they get so hot after 5 mins use that you can hardly hold them. the 60 watt power and such a small handle really do cause a problem but that can be cured.
What cannot be cured so easily is the fact that after 30 mins of use i have managed to remove one small capacitor with them. The tips get very hot and look the business but the tips move one there own as the are not fixed and after what seems an age on a capacitor or similar, the part is still as firmly affixed as it was before the tweezers went anywhere near it.

over all - don't waste your money.

the only explanation i have is that the heat is drawn away from the tips very quickly and even tho the solder melts it doesn't have enough power to heat the component fully.

mike

info:


The use of SMD technology in electronics requires new tools for handling SMD components. With the Zweezer a simple handling of these construction units is given SMD solder handle tweezers to set. By the multiplicity of the pairs of points with width, in the scope of supply, from 2 to 30 mm, all construction units leave themselves how: Chip resistances, Chip-condenser, SOT, Flat luggage ICs, Small Footprint 8 - 24 pin, Flat Package, DIP ICs etc. work on. Thus one carries for the different forms and sizes today's and future SMD housings of the calculation.

imaga_050
14th June 2012, 06:35
They really should have a screw so the width was possible to fixate, and a variety of tips too, IMO.
but they seem very hard to work width like they are.
Thanks for this review as i was looking into buying a pair just like these, i'm putting it of for now.

Bad_Ad84
14th June 2012, 06:42
I have smd tweezers much better than those (and plug into my soldering station, rather than own power). But it's still easier to just use hot air


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk. Please excuse any crazy auto corrects or lack of detail (links to info sources)

AmmoJammo
14th June 2012, 07:02
I use two irons for simple components, hot air for more legs ;)

rkauer
14th June 2012, 08:12
I use to use two solder irons. Now I surrender to hot air for almost all tasks, but desoldering legs from large ground planes.

From the occasional stubborn ground planes, I have a soldering gun. 110W of powah!

Allen1
14th June 2012, 09:22
I wouldn't have gone for the mains operated ones, the ones I use are Net 950, they have their own variable temperature transformer and also plug into my Aoyue hot air's soldering iron socket. They are good for chip resistors and caps but for the likes of the Amiga SMD caps, they tend to boil the little beggars as the tips are quite wide and the smaller tips do not pass enough heat to remove them.

As mentioned either 2 irons if there is space for them or even better the hot air option, if its just chip components then hot tweezers are generally OK as they heat the immediate area and you won't blow other components away. As you mention thick tracks such as ground planes etc quickly draw away the heat so its a case of see which method is best for the job in hand. You can always use foil or Kapton tape to shield close by components which will make using the hot air method the best option in a lot of cases.

storhemulen
14th June 2012, 09:39
When using hot air, the basic idea is to protect surrounding components with something (alu foil for instance) and then heat the component while applying some pulling force at the same time (using tweezers for instance)?

I have never done this but would be interesting to hear how you guys do it.

Bad_Ad84
14th June 2012, 09:45
When using hot air, the basic idea is to protect surrounding components with something (alu foil for instance) and then heat the component while applying some pulling force at the same time (using tweezers for instance)?

I have never done this but would be interesting to hear how you guys do it.

Pretty much exactly it.

imaga_050
14th June 2012, 17:43
You can always use foil or Kapton tape to shield close by components which will make using the hot air method the best option in a lot of cases.

I wouldn't use it with a motherboard in any case :unsure: :D

I'm so sorry i couldn't resist

mjnurney
14th June 2012, 19:43
i either use the two two gun turtle approach - two mini weller irons and its easy enough to do , i used to use hot air and that works too. i wanted to try these as it seems a good idea but sadly you need to spend much more money on them than i did.

better still get the ones that plug in to a soldering station as Adam mentions.

mike.

Allen1
14th June 2012, 19:58
You can always use foil or Kapton tape to shield close by components which will make using the hot air method the best option in a lot of cases.

I wouldn't use it with a motherboard in any case :unsure: :D

I'm so sorry i couldn't resist

Tut tut :lol::lol::lol:

AmmoJammo
15th June 2012, 02:44
I bought a cheap cheap hot air rework station off ebay when my Quick (brand) soldering station stopped working.

989D is the model number, haven't used it much, but seems ok, soldering iron cord is too short though :p