Or nearest offer

Slayer

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Greetings (y)

Just for clarity

When you are running a sale auction and state a price and add after it or nearest offer

Does this mean you have to accept the closest offer to your stated price?

:unsure:

thankyakindly :nod:
 

Zetr0

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good god no!

say I was selling a neon-blue gerber fish for £120 + postage (or near offer)

Tiny Tim PM's me with an offer of £100 + postage

since these neon-blue gerber fish are new they are worth atleast £110 to me - so I PM Tiny Tim back with a counter offer of

"hiyas Tim, thanks for your interest in my item, but the lowest I could let these go for is £110 + pnp"

I then give Tim appropriate time to respond - if he doesn't or passes on the offer then I would move to the next in line...


you will find that neon-blue gerber fish are quite the hot commodity ;)
 

r0jaws

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I want one! I must possess it! :D

Have you got any more?
 

Zetr0

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I want one! I must possess it! :D

Have you got any more?


will be getting some more on Friday =D


available in four fruity-neon colours - theres the

mac-classic neon-blue
vibrant-fresh neon-yellow
shocking-neon-green
skin-blister-neon-orange

theres 2 to a packet - all come with proper feeding and cleaning instructions.

PC146N-0.jpg
 

Slayer

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Oooook

lol, I better get to bed it's 2:20am and I need to get some sleep for work, up at 6:30am

but since we are off down the beaten path of fishness and I spent the last 20 mins looking and I'm too sleepy to look anymore...

does anyone recall what the max file size in bytes on AmigaOS? Not 2.1 Gig, I need the exact amount something like, 2,173,160.736 or similair... I forget the formula to calculate it and I can't find it with google... thanks very much :-D
 

Zetr0

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@Slayer

I think you will find that 2GB is 2,097,152 MBytes
 

User1301

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@Zetr0

I did actually laugh out loud at your analogy on the original post - brilliant stuff :)

J
 

Slayer

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Umm thanks for your help guys but I don't think you understand, there is an absolute byte limit to a file before it heads 1 byte into LARGE_FILE_SUPPORT

It's over 2.1 gigs and I recall it being written somewhere but I can't remember LOL... it's just so I can split these movie files that come in at just over this amount... 2.2 gigs etc... instead of chopping them in half I thought I'd go for 100k shorter etc which probably won't affect it...

understandamendo? ;)

I can sense I'm going to be googling again :-D

for example one file is 2116478976 and shows properly in AmiDVD but another file is 2209532682 which shows up as a negative value in AmiDVD because it doesn't support large files...

So the figure I am looking for is obviously between those two (y)

Edit

I think I've cracked it gentlemen 2147483647 I believe :nod:
 
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Zetr0

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fh^actualy speaking

I ballsed up earlier - its not 2097157 MBytes - its 2097157 KBytes!

Code:
 MBytes:  2048
 KBytes: (2048*1024)    = 2,097,152
  Bytes: (2097152*1024) = 2,147,483,648
Nibbles: (2147483648*2) = 4,294,967,296
   Bits: (2147483648*8) = 17,179,869,184
 
R

Rixa

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Is the for sure that the maximum file size 2 MiB though? On FAT32 the maximum file size is 4 GiB minus one.

(MiB and GiB are little-used units that I'm using here because "MB" can mean a multiple of 1000000, 1048576 or even 1024000 depending on the context).
 

Slayer

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It's only the limit for software that doesn't include support for Large Files... The filesystems themselves, namely JXFileSystem4 4.34, SmartFilesystem 1.286 or similair will handle larger files easily or at least 2 x the conveyed size we mention :cool:

---------- Post added at 10:24 ---------- Previous post was at 10:17 ----------

2,147,483,648 Bytes

Don't know how I missed this :LOL: (y)
 

AmiNeo

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Hehehe :LOL:

I spotted it, just didnt wanna be too much of an ass :p

---------- Post added at 12:14 ---------- Previous post was at 12:05 ----------

Is the for sure that the maximum file size 2 MiB though? On FAT32 the maximum file size is 4 GiB minus one.

(MiB and GiB are little-used units that I'm using here because "MB" can mean a multiple of 1000000, 1048576 or even 1024000 depending on the context).

Dont you mean MB and GB? MiB = Mebibyte ... are we talking mebibytes? Because thats a whole other kettle of fish. EDIT: Although it appears they have the same values :whistle: (Sorry not overly familiar with Mebi usage other than theyre not the standard.) FURTHER EDIT: (From Wiki) "The mebibyte is a multiple of the unit byte for quantities of digital information. The binary prefix mebi means 2^20, therefore 1 mebibyte is 1048576bytes. The unit symbol for the mebibyte is MiB.[1] The unit was established by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in 2000 and has been accepted for use by all major standards organizations. It was designed to replace the megabyte used in some computer science contexts to mean 2^20 bytes, which conflicts with the SI definition of the prefix mega."
So I guess this is just people reinventing the wheel and technically mebibyte should be the true name for megabyte as its mathmatically correct :roll:


Eh, you learn something new every day :D This has been a rewarding experience. (y) /Takes foot out of mouth



---------- Post added at 12:21 ---------- Previous post was at 12:14 ----------

Also, for the record, its also just Hard Drive manufacturers that round it to 1GB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes. Thats why a 20GB Hard Drive actually only holds around 18.65 GB and you never get the true space quoted. In other math giga would mean a billion but with computers, we work in binary so its not a decimal figure, even though its shown as a decimal number. EDIT: It appears this is why Kibi, Mebi, gibi and tibi prefixes were created.

I guess you were right about me being hard to live with :LOL:

---------- Post added at 12:24 ---------- Previous post was at 12:21 ----------

Edit

I think I've cracked it gentlemen 2147483647 I believe :nod:
Also just to point out... The above figure is exactly 2 GigaBytes minus 1 byte. (y)
 
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